Presidential Healthcare center

We provide the same Preventive Executive Physical Program as received by the President of the United States.


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Preventive Healthcare – Use this List as Your Guide

Have you received these tests?  How else can you confirm that you’re truly healthy and will stay healthy for many more years to come? 

Use this list as your guide:

Liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, kidneys screening
Blood Pressure Monitoring

Sleep Study
Cholesterol analysis & Blood clot risk
Coronary Heart Scan Calcium Scoring
Exercise Stress Testing

Brain MRI
Blood Count
Tumor marker tracking
PSA
Thyroid, Sex Hormones (e.g. Testosterone)
Infectious Disease (e.g. Lyme, Hepatitis, Sexually transmitted)
Genetic (Celiac Disease)
Virtual Colonoscopy
Pelvic and Genital Imaging (bladder, prostate, uterus, ovaries)care
Mammogram (3D Mammography)
Lung Imaging
Pulmonary Function Testing

Pap Smear
Bone Density Assessment
Dermatology Skin Screen

Hearing Assessment
Nutrition Counseling
Travel Medicine Consultations
Routine Vaccinations
Special Vaccinations 

 


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Does Your Firm Make Your Healthcare a Priority?

The Presidential Healthcare Center offers Corporate and Small Business options that focus on annual Preventive Executive Head shot 2Physicals which include: intensive imaging, laboratory testing, and primary care services.

The Presidential Healthcare Center already provides care for executives from:

Northrop Grumman Corporation

EADS North America Airbus

Pentagon Federal Credit Union

Ernst & Young

LaSalle Hotels

Discovery Channel Multiple

Corporate Agreement form


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Vegetarianism Associated With Reduced Risk For Colorectal Cancer

vegan 3Vegetarian diets are associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Nearly 80,000 adults from the Adventist Health Study 2 completed food-frequency questionnaires at baseline and then were divided into five dietary groups: vegan (8% of the population), lacto-ovo vegetarian (29%), pesco-vegetarian (10%), semi-vegetarian (6%), and non-vegetarian (48%).vegan 2

During 7 years’ follow-up, researchers documented 490 cases of colorectal cancer. Compared with non-vegetarians, all vegetarians combined had a significantly reduced risk for colorectal cancer (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.78). When examined by type of vegetarian diet, only pesco-vegetarians had a significant reduction in risk (hazard ratio, 0.57).

VEgan 1“The evidence that vegetarian diets may be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer, along with prior evidence of the potential reduced risk of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and mortality, should be considered carefully in making dietary choices and in giving dietary guidance,” the authors conclude.

Source: New England Journal of Medicine

March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month.


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Is A Gluten-Free Diet Really Good For Our Health?

Gluten 2Gwyneth Paltrow, Ryan Gosling and Jenny McCarthy are just some of the celebrities who have adopted a gluten-free diet – not necessarily because they have a gluten intolerance, but because they deem the diet to be healthier. As such, the diet seems to have become the latest “trend.” It is estimated that around 1.6 million people in the US follow a gluten-free diet without having been diagnosed with celiac disease – a severe gluten intolerance. But does this diet really benefit our health?

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a combination of wheat and rye). It acts as a “glue” in foods such as cereal, bread and pasta, helping them hold their shape. Gluten can also be found in some cosmetic products, such as lip balm, and it is even present in that nasty tasting glue on the back of stamps and envelopes.

In some individuals, consuming gluten can cause illness. It is estimated that around 18 million people in the US have some form of gluten intolerance – referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) – causing symptoms such as bloating or gas, diarrhea, fatigue, headache and itchy skin rash.

Around 1 in 133 people in the US, or 1% of the population, have celiac disease – a more serious form of gluten intolerance. InGluten 1 celiac disease, gluten triggers an immune response that attacks the lining of the small intestine. This means the body is unable to effectively absorb nutrients into the bloodstream, which can lead to anemia, delayed growth and weight loss.

Celiac disease can lead to other conditions, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), osteoporosis, infertility and neurological conditions if left untreated, and the only effective treatment for celiac disease is to adopt a strict lifelong gluten-free diet.

Source: Medical News Today


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Year Born May Determine Obesity Risk

obesity1Investigators working to unravel the impact of genetics versus environment on traits such as obesity may also need to consider a new factor: when individuals were born.

In the current issue of PNAS Early Edition a multi-institutional research team reports finding that the impact of a variant in the FTO gene that previous research has linked to obesity risk largely depends on birth year, with no correlation between gene variant and obesity in study participants born in earlier years and a far stronger correlation than previously reported for those born in later years.

“Looking at participants in the Framingham Heart Study, we found that the correlation between the best known obesity-obesity 2associated gene variant and body mass index increased significantly as the year of birth of participants increased,” says Harvard Medical School instructor James Niels Rosenquist of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Department of Psychiatry, lead author of the report. “These results — to our knowledge the first of their kind — suggest that this and perhaps other correlations between gene variants and physical traits may vary significantly depending on when individuals were born, even for those born into the same families.”

obesity 3The authors note that most studies of interactions between genes and the environment have looked at differences within specific birth cohorts —groups born during a particular span of years — which would not account for changes in the larger environment that take place over time. To investigate whether different conditions experienced by different age groups might alter the impact of a gene variant, they analyzed data from participants in the Framingham Offspring Study (which follows the children of participants in the original study) gathered between 1971, when participants ranged in age from 27 to 63, and 2008.

Source: Harvard Gazette

*The Presidential Healthcare Center can design a personalized exercise prescription for you.


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Bad Air In Our Gyms

gym 1With chilly weather settling in and darkness arriving before most people’s workdays end, many of us are shifting our workouts indoors, a practice that is much better for us than abandoning exercise for the winter. But a new study of air quality in gyms raises some interesting questions about whether the places in which we work out are as healthy as they should be.

Science and common sense tell us that exercising in polluted air is undesirable. People who frequently run alongside heavily trafficked freeways and breathe great lungfuls of exhaust have been shown to have an increased risk of heart disease, even if they are otherwise in admirably good shape. But few studies systematically have examined the air quality inside gyms.gym 2

Therefore, from the journal Building and Environment, researchers at the University of Lisbon in Portugal and the Technical University of Delft in Holland decided that they would place air-quality monitoring equipment in gyms throughout Lisbon. … Their findings were disquieting. In general, the gyms showed high levels of airborne dust, formaldehyde and carbon dioxide. The concentrations of these substances generally exceeded most gym 3accepted standards for indoor air quality. (No government agency in the United States formally monitors air quality in gyms.) The levels were especially high during evening aerobics classes, when many people were packed into small studios, stirring up dust and fumes and puffing heavily, producing carbon dioxide with every breath. … In sufficient concentrations, these substances can contribute to asthma and other respiratory problems, she said. Almost all of the gyms in the study had levels of these substances that significantly exceed European standards for healthy indoor air standards.

Source: New York Times


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Obesity Is Tied to Pollutants

smokingExposure to secondhand smoke and roadway traffic may be tied to increased body mass index in children and adolescents, a new study suggests.

Researchers studied 3,318 children in 12 Southern California communities beginning at an average age of 10, and then followed them through age 18. They used parental questionnaires to establish exposure to smoking, and data on traffic volume and levels of nitrogen dioxide, ozone and particulates to track pollution.

The study, in Environmental Health Perspectives, controlled for many other factors: sex, initial B.M.I., asthma, physical activity, insurance status, parental education and income, acres of parks and open space nearby, percentage of people living in poverty in each community.

obesityBut even after accounting for these issues and more, they found that compared with children exposed to no secondhand smoke or near-roadway air pollution, B.M.I. was 0.80 higher in children exposed to pollution alone, 0.85 higher in those exposed to secondhand smoke alone, and 2.15 higher in those exposed to both.

A normal B.M.I. for adults is 18.5 to 24.9. Higher than 25 is considered overweight, and above 30 obese.

“It would be interesting to know more about the mechanism,” said the lead author, Dr. Rob McConnell, a professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California. “But the finding challenges the view that obesity is due solely to increased caloric intake and reduced physical activity. That’s not the whole story.”

Source: New York Times