Presidential Healthcare center

We provide the same Preventive Executive Physical Program as received by the President of the United States.


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Cardiovascular Screening May Be Worthwhile For Middle-Aged Athletes

Heart 2Cardiovascular screenings are a cost-effective way to identify middle-aged athletes who may risk heart attacks or strokes by participating in high-intensity sports, a new study suggests.

“I would suggest that all middle-aged athletes should be screened at least once, particularly men over 40 and women over 50,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Andrea Menafoglio, a cardiologist at Ospedale San Giovanni in Bellinzona, Switzerland.

While the benefits of regular exercise are well known, vigorous physical exertion can be life-threatening for older athletes who may not realize that they have an underlying heart condition. Guidelines in Europe and the U.S. urge cardiovascular risk evaluations for middle-aged athletes, but researchers say the recommendations aren’t universally followed because widespread implementation hasn’t proved effective or affordable.

To see if widespread screening could detect hidden symptoms and risks for heart disease at a reasonable price, MenafoglioHeart 3 and colleagues at three hospitals in Switzerland evaluated 785 athletes between the ages of 35 and 65.

Each of the athletes reported spending at least two hours a week participating in high-intensity sports such as running, cycling, triathlon, football, swimming, tennis, climbing, or cross-country skiing.

The initial evaluation included a personal and family history, a physical heart 5exam, and a resting electrocardiogram, or ECG. For each participant, the researchers also estimated the risk of death from cardiovascular disease within the next 10 years based on gender, age, cholesterol level, blood pressure, and smoking habits.

Overall, the cost of screening averaged $199 per athlete (about 160 euros), because most athletes didn’t need any testing beyond the initial evaluation.

About one in seven athletes needed additional screening. Extra tests found some cases of previously unimagined diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, and mild heart valve disease.

Overall, the screenings caught previously undetected cardiovascular abnormalities in about 3 percent of participants and aheart 4 high cardiovascular risk profile in about 4 percent.

Just three athletes had abnormalities that made it too dangerous for them to continue their exercise routines.

Source: Reuters Health

“The Presidential Healthcare Center can design a personalized exercise prescription for you.”


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It’s National Heart Health Month!

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The month of February is dedicated to raising awareness about heart disease and increasing knowledge about prevention. Heart disease, including stroke, is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. However, heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions.

At the Center, we provide extensive screening for your heart, going far beyond what a typical physical may entail. We catch heart disease at its earliest stages and help you manage your choices to ensure that your heart stays healthy for years to come.

 


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Too Much Sitting May Raise Heart Failure Risk for Men

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Older men who spend a lot of time sitting around are more likely to face heart failure down the road, a new study shows. The research included more than 82,000 men between the ages of 45 and 69. Those who spent more time being sedentary outside of work hours, even if they exercised, had a higher risk for heart failure. “Men with low levels of physical activity were 52 percent more likely to develop heart failure than men with higher levels of physical activity,” said study author Deborah Rohm Young, a senior scientist at Kaiser Permanente in Pasadena, Calif. Young said those who spent at least five hours per day sitting were 34 percent more likely to develop heart failure than those who spent less than two hours a day sitting. The scientists used data from a large study called the California Men’s Health Study. None of the men had heart failure at the start of the study. “We looked at baseline information on a questionnaire about physical activity and sitting time outside of work,” said Young, who noted that the men were followed for up to a decade. Their exercise levels were calculated in a way that tallied how much energy the body uses. The researchers also tracked how many hours a day the men were sedentary. “Those who had low physical activity — who sat a lot and got little exercise — were more than twice as likely to have heart failure compared to those who were active and had not very much sitting time outside of work,” Young explained. Heart failure is the inability of the heart muscle to effectively pump blood throughout the body, said Young. It affects 5.7 million Americans — mostly older people. Approximately 20 percent of adults will be diagnosed with it during their lifetime, according to the American Heart Association. “It affects a lot of people. Of those who have heart failure, about half will die within five years of being diagnosed,” Young said, noting that transplants are rare and most with the condition manage it through medication. “But it is associated with a reduced quality of life.” Young said that even when she and her colleagues looked at people who developed heart disease or high blood pressure during the study, they found that being more active was still good. “It was more likely to protect against heart failure for those who had those conditions.” For those with heart issues who want to increase their exercise, it’s not too late, she said, although, “obviously they have to get a clearance from their physicians before changing their physical activity.” The take-home message is simple, Young said: Sit less, move more. “It doesn’t even require joining a gym,” she said. “Walking is the best exercise for the majority of people. Brisk walking. Thirty minutes a day is wonderful.”

Source: HealthDay